Economic Growth. Economic Inclusion. 

A growing and inclusive economy will deliver wage and employment gains to people of all races and ethnicities. Quality jobs will allow households not only to meet basic needs, but to build wealth. These indicators provide a more detailed look at the “Inclusive Growth” measures in the MSP Regional Indicators Dashboard, by disaggregating by race and place. These indicators are large-scale regional economic measures that are meant to be reviewed and understood together. 


Employment

Share of MSP population (16+) that is employed (%)

In a growing and economically inclusive region we would expect to see high employment overall and individuals of color employed at rates similar to White individuals.

Source: American Community Survey (ACS) Summary Files

Five-Year Change 2013-17 (%)

Source: American Community Survey (ACS) Summary Files

What we’re seeing

  • Employment growth among Black residents: Black residents have seen an almost 10% increase in employment since 2013, the largest increase of any race/ethnicity

  • Lagging employment among American Indian residents: The share of American Indians employed continues to lag all other races, by about 15% in 2017

  • High and steady employment among White, Hispanic, and Asian residents: Employment among White and Asian residents has held steady since 2013, at around 70% for each group

How many people live in MSP, by race/ethnicity?

 
 

What you can do with this map

Explore the variation of employment rates in MSP census tracts. Use the selection tools to examine employment in census tracts where poverty impacts more than 20% of residents or in tracts where the population is majority of-color.

Data for map are American Community Survey (ACS) five-year averages from the years 2013-2017. Single-year data are unavailable at the census tract-level.

 
 

wages

Average annual earnings for a full-time worker in MSP ($)

If our region is becoming more economically inclusive, we would expect to see that people of color are earning rising incomes and that gaps between White workers and workers of color would decrease.

Source: LEHD Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI)

5-Year Change 2013-17 ($)

Source: LEHD Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI)

What we’re seeing

  • Increasing wages: All races/ethnicities have seen wage gains since 2013, driven in part by inflation (see below for annual rates)

  • Wage gaps endure: White workers earned nearly twice what Black and American Indian workers did in every year since 2013

  • Employment does not equal wages: Despite steady or increasing employment, wages for Hispanic and Black workers continue to lag those of the region’s White workers

How many people live in MSP, by race/ethnicity?

Wages are in nominal dollars. According to the Minneapolis Fed, the rate of inflation (calculated using the Consumer Price Index) was 1.5% in 2013, 1.6% in 2014, 0.1% in 2015, 1.3% in 2016, and 2.1% in 2017. Data includes wage and salaried workers at all employers except the federal government.

 

What you can do with this map

Explore the variation in average wages across the region. Use the selection tools to examine wages in census tracts where poverty impacts more than 20% of residents or in tracts where the population is majority of-color.

Data source for map is different than data source for charts above it. Map shows data from the American Community Survey (ACS) for average wage of year-round full-time workers, for the five year period from 2013-2017. QWI is not available at the census tract-level.

 

Working poverty

Share of full-time MSP workers who earn a wage that cannot lift an average-size household above 185% of the poverty line (%)

PolicyLink notes in the National Equity Atlas: “As the low-wage sector has grown, the share of adults who are working full-time jobs but still cannot make ends meet has increased, particularly among Latinos and other workers of color. The failure of even full-time work to pay family-supporting wages dampens the potential of millions of workers and our nation as a whole.” 

5-Year Estimate 2013-17 (%)

Source: American Community Survey (ACS)

What we’re seeing

  • Full-time workers are in poverty: Approximately 1-in-2 Hispanic workers, 1-in-3 Black and American Indian workers, 1-in-4 Asian workers, and 1-in-5 White workers earns a wage that would not lift an average-size household above 185% of the poverty line

  • Hispanic workers have the highest share in poverty: A disproportionate share of Hispanic full-time workers earn a wage that would not lift an average-size household above 185% of the poverty line

How many people live in MSP, by race/ethnicity?

The average 185% FPL threshold for 2013-17 was $32,649 in inflation-adjusted 2017 dollars. The average household size for 2017 was 2.57. Data limited to full-time, year-round workers; excludes self-employed and active-duty personnel; no minimum or maximum age.